8 Myths of Financial Planning

Wp_Site_Admin Financial Planning

In a month or so, America heads into the summer “vacation” season and it makes sense that people are busy planning their getaways. Having a financial plan is a lot like having a travel plan in that it identifies where you’re going, how and when you’ll get there, how much it’ll cost, and things to do along the way. Like planning a vacation, your financial plan can be loosely structured or highly detailed based on your individual needs. However, having no plan at all could leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere. A recent Household Financial Planning Survey conducted …

Economic Review and GDP Spotlight

Wp_Site_Admin Financial Planning

“If owning stocks is a long-term project for you, following their changes constantly is a very, very bad idea. It’s the worst possible thing you can do, because people are so sensitive to short-term losses. If you count your money every day, you’ll be miserable.”- Daniel Kahneman Daniel Kahneman, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics and author of the New York Times bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, has helped investors better understand their thought biases in the hopes of creating a better investment experience. Even though we like to believe our decision making is rational, we are all …

The End of The 4 Percent Rule

Wp_Site_Admin Financial Planning, Retirement Planning

The "4 percent rule" was a retirement spending approach that became mainstream in the 1990s. The rule suggested that a retiree with an average portfolio distributed between stocks and bonds (approximately 60-40) should withdraw 4 percent of his or her retirement funds each year (adjusting each year for inflation). If the retiree could stay limited to that 4 percent, he or she would be able to fund retirement for at least 30 years. The simplicity of the 4 percent rule made it hugely popular with investors. The method made planning easy and was projected to leave the vast majority of ...

Tis The Season for Lists

Wp_Site_Admin Financial Planning, Portfolio Management, Tax Planning

‘Tis the season to review lists that we made either at the beginning of the year or at the beginning of the holiday season (and maybe even check them twice if you are like Santa). Lists are a great tool for many things. They give us a goal. They keep us focused. They give us feedback. Financial planners like goals, focus, and feedback. Financial planners love lists! Perhaps a list’s biggest benefit is the reference point it provides when your plan is under “attack”. We all can relate to walking into the store (or clicking for those internet shoppers) and …